Saturday, February 11, 2017

#ICERAIDS--The Hispanic Panic--LAUGHING AT THE DEPORTATION SWEEP--

TO YESENIA
FROM REYNALDO
SUBJ  PROCEDURE


(THE CANTINA)--Following procedure in case DHS agents come rapping at the door--

1.) Keep door locked, cover the windows with dark sheets
2.) Stock up on food and water.
3.) Keep the kids home from school
4.) Develop a secret code to communicate with compadres through text messaging.
4.) Keep the car topped off with gas and supplies, park at an undisclosed location

If the agents are persistent  and you feel the compulsion to open the door, make sure no one else is present.

Above all, demand identification--




FWD ALL UNITS, FIELD, WAREHOUSE, COMPOUND, PVT MERTZ, KP SCULLERY--

#ICERAIDS--Office of Civilian Defense--USE NUCLEAR BLAST PROCEDURE

TO YESENIA
FROM REYNALDO
SUBJ A SIMPLE PROCESS

(THE BUNKER)--Following procedure when the Immigration Cops rap on your door, recommend same as for nuclear detonation in vicinity--




* NOTICE OFFICE OF CIVILIAN DEFENSE
WASHINGTON D. C.
* ***************************************** *
INSTRUCTION TO PATRONS ON PREMISES * *
IN CASE OF NUCLEAR BOMB ATTACK:
UPON THE FIRST WARNING: 
1. STAY CLEAR OF ALL WINDOWS.
2. KEEP HANDS FREE OF GLASSES, BOTTLES, CIGARETTES, ETC.
3. STAND AWAY FROM BAR, TABLES, ORCHESTRA, EQUIPMENT AND FURNITURE.
4. LOOSEN NECKTIE, UNBUTTON COAT AND ANY OTHER RESTRICTIVE CLOTHING.
5. REMOVE GLASSES, EMPTY POCKETS OF ALL SHARP OBJECTS SUCH AS PENS, PENCILS, ETC.
6. IMMEDIATELY UPON SEEING THE BRILLIANT FLASH OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSION, BEND OVER AND PLACE YOUR HEAD FIRMLY BETWEEN YOUR LEGS.
7. THEN KISS YOUR ASS GOODBYE.


FWD PVT MERTZ, BRIG CHASER DUTY CCCF--








ICE RAIDS--CodeName: Tango Echo Oscar--TOSSED UNDER THE SCHOOL BUS

TO REYNALDO
FROM HECTOR
SUBJ WHITE LIGHTNING COMMUNIQUE 001

(2ND AVENUE HQ)--Be advised that all fwd op units of your organization are now at risk of penetration and sweep by DHS agents disguised as fruit vendors, school bus crossing cops, timeshare sales representatives and high mountain installers.

We have inside info that the sweep that has begun in the early morning hours of Saturday will continue at a regular pace even as agent directors in authority have declared the arrests "routine"

BRYAN COX, public immigration enemy # 1 describes "sensitive location policy" concerning busting undocumented kids at schools, churches, daycare centers--


"..preapproved at the highest level of the agency..."




The arrests were made "about a half-a-mile" from where the school bus stop was located...

FWD ALL FIELD OPS INCL PVT MERTZ, KP CMD, 28THCP--

ICE RAIDS--Iceniks on the March--IMMIGRANTS BUSTED TWEETFEED




           

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

JUDGE RICHARD CLIFTON--#MuslimBan Discrimination Threshold--CALCULUS OF PERCENTAGES

TO HAYES
FROM SOLDIER
SUBJ THECALCULUS OF PERCENTAGES

((MAGNUM ESTATE)--The judge has brought into focus just where the Muslims stand when it comes to the travel ban battle currently underway in the 9th Circuit Appeals Court.

Judge Clifton--

Justice Department argues for restoration of Trump travel ban

Fox News-1 hour ago
Judge Richard Clifton, a George W. Bush nominee, asked an attorney ... He said only 15 percent of the world's Muslims were affected, ...
 
Following are racial discrimination percentages in America--
 
 
Racial discrimination and unfair treatment is a reality reported by considerable shares of Black and Hispanic Americans. A third of Blacks (35 percent) and about a quarter of Hispanics (26 percent) say they have experienced certain types of racial discrimination, such as being denied a job or housing, or being prevented from voting, compared to about 1 in 10 (11 percent) Whites. In addition, more than 4 in 10 Blacks (45 percent) say they have at some point been afraid their life was in danger because of their racial or ethnic background, compared to 27 percent of Whites and 20 percent of Hispanics.
 
According to the statistics, 15 percent of the world's Muslims being affected falls just below the threshold for the discrimination averages for American ethnic groups.
 
Where exactly the boundary for discrimination is for Muslims has yet to be determined, it may well be below Blacks and Hispanics and peak at 15 percent.  A ruling against the Muslim Ban might indeed establish a threshold for Muslims on just where they stand with other ethnic groups when it comes to discrimination in America.
 
As an example as to where the Muslim Ban might fall into the percentages, note the following graph--
 
 
 
 
 
FWD ALL FIELD KP UNITS, PVT JC POTSHACK 27TH H&S--


 
 
 
 
 
 

Monday, February 6, 2017

JAMES L ROBART--The #MuslimBan Judge--5 THINGS THEY DIDN'T TELL US

TO HAYES
FROM YAZMINA
SUBJ  MEDIA COVERUP

(DOLLAR HILL)

Certainly the media portrays the #MuslimBan judge as some sort of saint, as opposed to the President  phrase of "so-called" judge, but here are a few things to consider--

1995--The Texaco Sex Bias Case--here Judge Robart, as a defense attorney for the oil company, all but called the woman involved,  Janella Sue Martin, a nut job who created friction and morale problems at work.



2005--The Judge throws out a 17 year ban against strip clubs in Seattle--



2013--Robart hands down an 18 year sentence for a terror plot against a Muslim convert...

ABU KHALID ABDUL LATIF
 
 
 
2016--Judge Robart dismisses a lawsuit brought on by the Native American Nez Perce tribe involving dredging...
 
                                                                                
 
 
 
#5--In progress--


FWD ALL KP FIELD UNITS--ATTN PVT MERTZ--

JAMES L ROBART-- #MuslimBan Judge Hands Out 18 Year Terror Plot Sentence-- ABU KHALID ABDUL LATIF CASE

TO YAZMINA
FROM YESENIA
SEATTLE PLOT TO ATTACK MILITARY BASE--


(DOLLAR HILL)-- Another episode in the #MUSLIMBAN judge's illustrious career--

Akron Beacon Journal--March 26, 2013--



Terror plot sentence A man who plotted to attack a Seattle military complex with machine guns and grenades was sentenced on Monday to 18 years in prison. Abu Kha-lid Abdul-Latif, 35, also was ordered by U.S. District Court Judge James L. Ro-bart to be supervised for 10 years after his release. Abdul-Latif, also known as Joseph Anthony Davis, pleaded guilty last December to conspiracy to murder U.S. officers and conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction.
Akron Beacon Journal--03/26/13


(Photo: Seattle PI)


FWD ALL FIELD KP UNITS--PVT MERTZ ATTN...





JAMES L ROBART--From Strip Club Ban to #MuslimBan--THE SEATTLE 2005 RULING--

TO ATILA FROM SOLDIER
SUBJ  JUDGE OK WITH EXOTIC DANCERS

(DOLLAR HILL)--Following article found on one of the judge's earlier rulings concerning a far more interesting ban--





Albuquerque Journal--Sept 16, 2005--


Judge Ends Ban On Strip Clubs SEATTLE—The city's 17-year moratorium on new strip clubs is an unconstitutional restraint on free speech and can no longer be enforced, a judge has ruled. U.S. District Judge James L. Robert ruled Monday that the city's rationale for repeatedly extending the ban lacked merit. The city had argued that the case was not a censorship issue, but that it was waiting for the state and county to adopt new cabaret regulations. It first imposed a temporary moratorium on new adult cabarets in 1988, after the , number of strip clubs in Seattle jumped from two to seven over two years, Still, if the City Council votes next week to adopt a rule banning lap dances, few new strip clubs may open in Seattle anyway. The panel is expected to vote on Mayor Greg Nickels' proposal requiring exotic dancers to remain 4 feet from their clients.


FWD PFC ELLIOTT, SPECIAL SVC, 28TH REGT, 3RD BN...




Sunday, February 5, 2017

JAMES L ROBART-- Sex Bias Case 1995-- TEXACO DEFENSE LAWYER

TO HAYES
FROM ATILA
SUBJ  THE SO-CALLED JUDGE CALLS WOMAN NUTS--

(BROCKWAY SUMMIT)--Following from the archives where the judge in the travel ban suit earned his stripes defending against sexual harassment charges for big corporation--


Los Angeles Times-- Nov 27, 1995--




Celebrated Sex Bias Case in Court Again
By STUART SILVERSTEIN TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janella Sue Martin once was the $20-million wom-an, the winner of a record-shattering award from a Los Angeles jury in a sex discrimination lawsuit against Texaco. Martin's court victory—against a corporate giant that she claims unfairly denied her job promotions and retaliated after she complained—brought her a "Feminist of the Year" honor and other acclaim from women's rights advo-cates. She was featured on TV shows and profiled in People magazine. It turned out that the fortune and most of the fame were fleeting; a judge Please see TEXACO, A18




TEXACO
Continued from Al rejected the jury's decision and tossed out her award in 1992, saying that it was shockingly "dis-proportionate to the injuries, dam-ages and conduct" and "unsupport-ed by the evidence." But starting today, Martin's law-yers will plead her case one last time, under a novel legal agree-ment providing a no-jury, no-ap-peal. final trial. It will bring to a climax a decade-long legal struggle that—after starting as a seemingly garden- variety employment dis-crimination suit—developed into a high-stakes drama. What the case lacks in cutting-edge legal issues it makes up for in intensity and color. It has been portrayed as everything from a blatant example of how lawyers can manipulate the sympathies of an unsophisticated jury to the story of a courageous woman's battle for justice in the workplace. The case has also put an un-wanted spotlight on a company long criticized by shareholder ac-tivists, and currently under scruti-ny by the federal government, for its policies regarding women and minorities. Martin, 52, went to work for Texaco in 1966 at a purchasing office in her native Arkansas. De-spite the legal battle, she has been a Texaco employee ever since; the company put her on administrative leave in August from her job as a credit supervisor, but she contin-ues to draw an annual salary in the low $70,000s. An engaging woman with an IQ of 138, Martin describes herself as a middle-of-the-road Republican who wasn't looking to become a symbol in the battle over sex discrimination. Win or lose in court, Martin says she wants to stay at Texaco. "This is not something I wanted to have happen to me," Martin said, her voice beginning to tremble. But, she said, after being passed over for several promotions only because she was a woman, "I realized that if I didn't do something, someone else would have to."









'inc neart of martin s case in-volves an alleged broken promise by Texaco. Martin says she accepted a transfer and promotion from Hous-ton to Los Angeles in 1984 on the understanding that she would be named credit manager of her new office as soon as the position was created. While she was on a vaca-tion, however, a male employee from Texas was moved into the job. Texaco denies that Martin's ex-boss, Gerard L. Fisher, who is also a defendant in the case, or anyone else ever promised to promote Martin to credit manager. "This. woman is prone to hear what she wants to hear," said James L. Robart, one of Fisher's lawyers. The company also says Martin, with only a year of college educa-tion, was less qualified than the man given the credit manager's job, who held a master's degree in business and later earned a law degree.
Texaco, moreover, has also gone on the offensive by questioning Martin's mental health. It asserts in a pretrial court filing that special-ists who have examined Martin agree she has the characteristics of a disorder "that causes her to wrongfully believe that all actions are directed at her and to react extremely to the normal stresses of everyday life." "In imagining conspiracy, dis-crimination and retaliation around every corner, it is Martin, not Texaco, who has engendered an abusive working environment for many of her fellow Texaco credit employees and supervisors," the company's brief argues. Martin replies that the retalia-tion she reported to Texaco man-agers and that she cites in her lawsuit was real, not imaginary. For example, she said she over-heard Texaco staffers plotting to get her fired. "When you hear it with your own ears that they're out to get you, they're out to get you," Martin said. Moreover, she said she vigilantly reported incidents of possible re-taliation to Texaco for her own legal protection and because "they told me it was my responsibility to report it to them." Now, she says, Texaco is trying to use that against her. As for.its companywide progress in hiring and promoting women, Texaco says it has made significant strides despite the company's






FWD PVT MERTZ KP 28TH CMD, CAMP SAN MATEO--



JAMES L ROBART--The Nez Perce Lawsuit 2016--SO-CALLED FISH STORY

TO HAYES FROM ATILA SUBJ  BACKGROUND ON SEATTLE JUDGE--

(BROCKWAY PASS)--Following in ref to the judge in the crosshairs of the recent travel ban

UPDATE--WASHINGTON POST--

On Sunday morning television talk shows, some Republicans in Congress took issue with comments by the president, particularly his description of U.S. District Judge James L. Robart as a “so-called judge.”
“I’ll be honest, I don’t understand language like that,” Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) said. “We don’t have so-called judges, we don’t have so-called senators, we don’t have so-called presidents. We have people from three different branches of government who take an oath to uphold and defend the Constitution. . . . So, we don’t have any so-called judges, we have real judges.”

FOLLOWING ON THE NATIVE AMERICAN TRIBE LAWSUIT--

Salem Statesman Journal  --Feb 11, 2016


Judge tosses suit against dredging
Associated Press
LEWISTON, Idaho - A federal judge in Seattle has dismissed a lawsuit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and others that sought to stop dredging of the Snake and Clearwater rivers to make way for barges. U.S. District Court Judge James L. Robart said in his Iliesday ruling that the plaintiffs were wrong on the merits of their case and lacked standing to bring a law-suit. The judge also said their complaints were moot because the project is now complete. The Lewiston Tribune said the plaintiffs includ-ed Idaho Rivers United, the Nez Perce 'fribe and Friends of the Clearwater. The environmental groups and tribe filed
their lawsuit in 2014. They contended that the dredging harmed salmon, steelhead and Pa-cific lamprey and was not economically justified. They also claimed the corps failed to consider other options to clear sed-iment from the navigation channel before it chose dredging as the best way to restore the navigation channel to a depth of 14 feet and a width of 250 feet. The groups asked for an injunction that would have delayed dredging until the case could be heard. Robart declined and the nearly $10 million dredging project was fin-ished in early 2015. Robart said the plaintiffs lacked standing because they failed to show fish would suffer any "concrete and particularized" harm from dredging.

CONTINUE FOLLOWUP ON JUDGE--





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